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Open Access Research

Assessment of quality of life of the children and parents affected by inborn errors of metabolism with restricted diet: preliminary results of a cross-sectional study

Alexandre Fabre1, Karine Baumstarck2*, Aline Cano3, Anderson Loundou2, Julie Berbis2, Brigitte Chabrol3 and Pascal Auquier1

Author Affiliations

1 Multidisciplinary pediatric unit, Hôpital d’Enfants de la Timone, AP-HM, 27 bd Jean Moulin, Marseille 13385, France

2 EA3279, Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Université de la Méditerranée, 27 bd Jean Moulin, Marseille 13385, France

3 Centre de Référence des Maladies Héréditaires du Métabolisme, Hôpital d’Enfants de la Timone, AP-HM, 27 bd Jean Moulin, Marseille 13385, France

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Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 2013, 11:158  doi:10.1186/1477-7525-11-158

Published: 19 September 2013

Abstract

Introduction

The development in therapeutic strategies has increased survival of children affected by inborn errors of metabolism with restricted diet (IEMRD). These diseases have mild- and long-term consequences on the health. Little is known about the impact on the quality of life (QoL) of children and their families. The aims of this study were: to compare the QoL of the children and parents affected by IEMRD with the QoL of the general population and one pathology associated with long-term consequences.

Patients and methods

This cross-sectional study was performed at the French Reference Center for inborn metabolic disorders (Marseille, France). Inclusion criteria were: a child with a diagnosis of organic aciduria, urea cycle defect, or maple syrups urine disease (MSUD). Socio-demographics, clinical data, and QoL were recorded.

Results

Twenty-one of 32 eligible families were included during a planned routine visit. Ten (47%, 95% CI 27-69%) children were affected by organic aciduria, six (29%, 95% CI 10-48%) by urea cycle defects, and five (24%, 95% CI 6-42%) by MSUD. Among the younger children, the general well-being was significantly lower in the children with IEMRD than in the leukemia children (58 ± 16 versus 76 ± 15, p = 0.012), and among the older children, the leisure activities were significantly lower in the children with IEMRD than in the leukemia children (29 ± 18 versus 62 ± 22, p < 10-3), while the relationships with teachers were better (76 ± 23 versus 60 ± 23, p = 0.01). The physical QoL score was lower in the parents than in the French norms (66 ± 21 versus 75 ± 1, p = 0.05). Factors modulating QoL were: eating and neurologic disorders, enteral nutrition, and feeding modalities.

Conclusion

The children and the parents of children affected presented altered ‘physical’ and ‘social’ QoL scores compared with the norms and patients with leukemia and their families. Future studies based on larger cohort studies should determine the different weights of potential predictive factors of QoL.

Keywords:
Inborn errors of metabolism with restricting dietary; Organic aciduria; Urea cycle defect; Maple syrups urine disease; Quality of life; VSP-A; WHOQOL-BREF